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Welcome to day seven of Tribal Business News’ 12 days of Indigenous holiday gifts guide. In the spirit of supporting Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs and drawing attention to some truly gorgeous and inspired items, we are presenting 12 consecutive days of Native-made products perfect for holiday gift-giving, including giving to yourself.

Day 7: 

Midnight Storm T, $40-$43, LightningKevShop.com

GGMidnightStorm2The Midnight Storm shirt from Isleta Pueblo and Hopi graphic designer Kevin Coochwytewa. (Kevin Coochwytewa Design)Hopi and Isleta Pueblo graphic designer Kevin Coochwytewa has captured lightning on a T-shirt, and it’s the perfect storm of Pueblo style. 

“The Midnight Storm shirt features an abstract landscape design with Pueblo and Hopi rain clouds, lightning, plant and water symbols,”Coochwytewa said. “It was inspired by songs and prayers for rain, and the thunderstorms that roll in during the late night hours. These storms are needed year-round to bless the land, all life, and to nourish and feed our crops.”

The striking limited edition unisex shirt glimmers with metallic gold silkscreen print, and is made with soft, lightweight cotton, polyester and rayon. 

Coochwytewa, former senior designer and art director for the Heard Museum in Phoenix, has made a career of incorporating Native culture and designs into logos and marketing material. 

He also works on personal activist art projects. In fall of this year, Coochytewa’s eye-catching “I Vote” graphic encouraging the Native vote went viral, and he adapted it into T-shirts and posters. 

“Art and design run in Native blood and our people have been creating beautiful and unique works of art for hundreds of years,”Coochwytewa said. “There are countless talented Indigenous artists and entrepreneurs out there who are designing quality products and offering services that are unique and offer a fresh perspective. It’s important to take the time to find these individuals and companies and support them however we can — whether it’s buying directly from them or sharing their work and websites within our circles and social media networks.”

 

Previous gift ideas

Day 1: Quirky, comical calendar by Ricardo Caté 

Day 2: Stationery and scarf set by B. Yellowtail and Debbie Desjarlais Design

Day 3: Baby Yoda power by M Reed Designs Boutique

Day 4: Alaska Native ornaments by Trickster Company

Day 5: Sleek Salish jacket by Ay Lelum

Day 6: Far-out wall art by Johnnie Diacon Art

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EDITOR’S NOTE: This story has been updated from a previous version to correct the spelling of Coochwytewa’s last name. 

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About The Author
Tamara Ikenberg
Contributing Writer
Tamara Ikenberg is a senior reporter at Tribal Business News reporting on the arts and culture and tourism industries, and contributing to coverage of the Alaska Native business community. Based in Southern California, Ikenberg was a contributing writer for Native News Online and has reported for The Alaska Dispatch News, The Courier-Journal in Louisville, The Mobile Press Register, NYLON Magazine and The Baltimore Sun. She also previously worked as a grant and article writer at Juneau-based Sealaska Heritage Institute.
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